Books

“Humphrey’s new chick-lit is a romping good time.”

-The Kirkus Review (read the full review »)

Find my books at a local store:
C’est la Vie, Edmonds, WA
Third Place Books, Lake Forest Park WA
Barnes & Noble, Palm Desert, WA
Madison Park Books, Seattle, WA
Island Books, Mercer Island, WA
The Johnson Manor, Anacortes WA
AVAILABLE THROUGH ANY INDEPENDENT BOOKSTORE… JUST ASK!

How I Learned I’m Old (Pretty Good, Slightly Unpleasant and Surprisin)

HOW I LEARNED I’M OLD is a collection of humorous essays embedded with a smattering of serious insights. Together, they tell the tale of about what happens when middle age mysteriously departs and old age claims its territory.For this country’s 38 million BABY BOOMERS, topics like ‘The New Party Game’ (counting wrinkles on other women’s faces), the insulting arrival of chin hairs and the sudden inability to monitor personal opinions in the presence of strangers have universal appeal. So do chapters about ‘Mean Girls’ in their seventies and the emotional legacy of mothers.The book is divided into sections; “Mind” “Body” and “Spirit”. Always with a comical overtone, it also delves into the more important benefits and realizations of the aging process; what friends teach us by example, who we miss most when they’re gone and which values really matter.A former regional media writer/producer, Romney Humphrey is a produced playwright Off-Off-Broadway, in California and the Northwest. She has won national awards for her media writing and producing.

Available on Amazon

 

The May December Twist

The May/December TwistBased on real life stories of unlikely but wildly passionate long-term relationships between older women and younger men, The May/December Twist is a tale of alliances, conflicting values and what’s important in the complicated search for love.

At fifty, finding romance is hard. It’s trickier if your three best friends (Liz, Kendra and Jo; together known as The Four) sign you up for a dating site and monitor your every move. And, the challenge becomes more complicated when Jo starts competing with Allie for contenders. Allie eventually settles for David, an age-appropriate schoolteacher. He’s pleasant, but makes her feel sleepy, not particularly passionate. A chance encounter leads Allie to Jameson, a self-made entrepreneur. He’s brilliant, interesting and wildly attractive. He decides to volunteer at her non-profit, “Twenty”; he believes in Allie’s vision of volunteering twenty minutes or twenty dollars to the community is brilliant. They share the same sense of values and have definite chemistry. The problem? He’s twenty-five years younger. The Four consider her crush on Jameson inappropriate. Jo can’t believe Allie isn’t choosing David. (Or does she want him for herself?) If Allie pursues her feelings will she lose The Four’s friendship? Another issue? The possible wrath of her twin twenty-one-year-old sons. And, why would Jameson ever consider her as relationship material anyway?

Available on Amazon